Erik Benson
Still Life Landscape, 2020
Acrylic on linen over panel
20″ x 16″

Erik Benson
Sticker mended vase, 2020
Acrylic on linen over panel
18″ x 14″

Erik Benson
Still Life (boot/shoe), 2020
Acrylic on linen over panel
18″ x 14″

Chris Coffin
4 Open Water Swims, 2021
9.4 mi Kona, HI; 3.0 mi Hapuna, HI; 2.1 mi LI Sound; 1.8 mi Kona, HI 2.5 mi
Cyanotype, satellites, GPS, performance
8″ x 10″

Chris Coffin
3.0 mi swim Kona, HI, 2021
Cyanotype, satellites, GPS, performance
10″ x 8″

Chris Coffin
2.1 mi off Compo Beach, Westport, CT, 2021
Cyanotype, satellites, GPS, performance
10″ x 8″

Sato Yamamoto
Letter, 2022
Ink on paper
Dimensions Variable

Sato Yamamoto
Letter, 2022
Ink on paper
Dimensions Variable

Sato Yamamoto
Letter, 2022
Ink on paper
Dimensions Variable

Esperanza Cortes
I.D. Bracelet, 2013
13, Frescoes, amulets, glass beads, metal, chain,
10″ x 60″

Esperanza Cortes
Ojo I, 2013
Watercolor on paper
Dimensions variable

Esperanza Cortes
La Mano Poderosa, 2016 – 2019
Clay, chains, filigree beads
30″h x 20″w x 10″d

Ami Park
Air, 2020
Yarn, cotton rope, fabric, acrylic, and glue on cotton canvas
30 x 48 x 1.5 in
76 x 122 x 3.8 cm

Ami Park
Lips, 2020
Yarn, cotton rope, fabric, acrylic, and glue on canvas
11 x 14 x 1.7 in
28 x 35.5 x 3.8 cm

Ami Park
Fragment, 2020
Yarn, cotton rope, fabric, acrylic, and glue on canvas
11 x 14 x 1.7 in
28 x 35.5 x 3.8 cm

Kristen Schiele
Yacht (Installation Detail), 2018-2020
Acrylic on wood
Dimensions variable

Kristen Schiele
Yacht, 2018
Acrylic on wood
Dimensions variable

Kristen Schiele
Yacht, 2018
Acrylic on wood
Dimensions variable

Sam Heydt
Blue Wave, 2020
Analogue assemblage
30″ x 20″

Sam Heydt
Row row row your boat, 2020
Analogue assemblage
30″ x 20″

Sam Heydt
Weee all gonna die, 2020
Analogue assemblage
30″ x 20″

David Opdyke
Postcard Installation
Dimensions variable

Jaynie Crimmins
A Field Guide to Getting Lost [installation], 2018
Shredded promotional mailings, thread, over armature
Dimensions variable

Jaynie Crimmins
A Field Guide to Getting Lost #5, 2018
Shredded promotional mailings, thread, over armature, mounted on wood framed in a shadowbox with museum glass
12″ x 12″ x 8″D

Jaynie Crimmins
A Field Guide to Getting Lost #9, 2018
Shredded promotional mailings, thread, over armature, mounted on wood framed in a shadowbox with museum glass
12″ x 12″ x 2″D

Seren Morey
Sea Star Sangfroid, 2020
Ultralight acrylic,pumice and dispersions on panel
5″ x 5″ x 2 1/2″

Seren Morey
Infinity Octopi III, 2021
Ultralight acrylic, dispersions, glass beads and clay on panel
5″ x 5″ x 2 1/2″

Seren Morey
Otrxs, 2020
Ultralight acrylic and pigment dispersions on panel
13″ x 11″ x 3 1/2″

Beyond the Horizon

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 24th 6-9PM
Exhibition Dates: Sept. 24th – Dec. 11th, 2022

TECHNE
1609 Ord Way
Oceanside, CA 92056


The Royal @ RSOAA in partnership with TECHNE in Oceanside, California is pleased to present Beyond the Horizon, a group exhibition featuring artists Erik Benson, Chris Coffin, Sato Yamamoto, Esperanza Cortes, Ami Park, Kristen Schiele, Sam Heydt, David Opdyke, Jaynie Crimmins, Seren Morey.

The horizon is the apparent line that separates the surface of a celestial body from its sky when viewed from the perspective of an observer on or near the surface of the relevant body. This line divides all viewing directions based on whether it intersects the relevant body’s surface or not.

The true horizon is a theoretical line, which can only be observed to any degree of accuracy when it lies along a relatively smooth surface such as that of Earth’s oceans. At many locations, this line is obscured by terrain, and on Earth it can also be obscured by life forms such as trees and/or human constructs such as buildings. The resulting intersection of such obstructions with the sky is called the visible horizon. On Earth, when looking at a sea from a shore, the part of the sea closest to the horizon is called the offing.

In many contexts, especially perspective drawing, the curvature of the Earth is disregarded and the horizon is considered the theoretical line to which points on any horizontal plane converge (when projected onto the picture plane) as their distance from the observer increases. For observers near sea level, the difference between this geometrical horizon (which assumes a perfectly flat, infinite ground plane) and the true horizon (which assumes a spherical Earth surface) is imperceptible to the unaided eye. However, for someone on a 1000-meter hill looking out across the sea, the true horizon will be about a degree below a horizontal line.